Testing Hub

All State Comparison of Testing Efforts

Through up-to-date visuals, track how testing volume, positivity, and proportion give a sense of whether the occurrence of new cases is slowing or growing.

State
Last Week
Two Weeks
Ago
Difference
Arizona6.4%6.9%-0.5%
New Hampshire0.8%1.0%-0.2%
Maine0.6%0.6%-0.0%
Connecticut1.3%1.2%0.1%
Iowa15.8%13.5%2.3%
Delaware5.8%8.1%-2.3%
Hawaii3.3%3.3%-0.0%
Florida11.7%12.3%-0.7%
South Dakota17.9%16.9%1.0%
New Mexico2.1%2.2%-0.1%
Nebraska12.8%9.4%3.5%
Michigan2.7%2.9%-0.3%
North Carolina5.0%4.5%0.5%
California2.8%3.3%-0.6%
Texas11.3%9.4%1.9%
Montana5.9%4.2%1.7%
Tennessee5.6%5.8%-0.1%
Georgia7.4%9.8%-2.4%
Washington2.9%3.1%-0.2%
Colorado4.4%3.4%1.0%
Missouri11.6%10.9%0.7%
Minnesota4.7%3.2%1.4%
Vermont0.3%1.0%-0.7%
North Dakota6.2%5.9%0.4%
Wyoming11.3%4.0%7.3%
New Jersey1.7%1.9%-0.2%
Idaho17.5%16.9%0.6%
Mississippi4.1%15.8%-11.8%
Puerto Rico100.0%100.0%0.0%
Nevada10.0%8.6%1.4%
Oklahoma9.1%6.9%2.2%
Arkansas20.7%5.2%15.5%
Rhode Island1.5%1.1%0.4%
Wisconsin17.3%14.6%2.8%
Alabama14.0%16.8%-2.8%
South Carolina7.5%12.5%-5.0%
New York0.9%0.9%-0.0%
Ohio2.8%3.6%-0.8%
Pennsylvania6.2%6.8%-0.6%
Oregon6.7%4.9%1.8%
West Virginia4.4%4.7%-0.3%
Massachusetts0.6%0.8%-0.1%
Louisiana3.5%4.0%-0.5%
Kentucky6.9%3.5%3.5%
District of Columbia1.3%1.7%-0.3%
Utah13.9%12.0%1.9%
Kansas15.4%13.8%1.7%
Indiana8.9%6.2%2.7%
Maryland5.1%6.4%-1.3%
Illinois3.5%3.6%-0.1%
Virginia5.2%7.0%-1.8%
Alaska2.4%3.8%-1.4%
Last Week: % positive tests last week
Two Weeks Ago: % positive tests two weeks ago

About this page:

This page was last updated on Wednesday, September 23, 2020 at 03:00 AM EDT.

Weekly Change in Positive Tests in All States

Weekly percent change in positive tests.

This graph answers two questions for each state:

  • Of the tests performed in the last week, what percentage were positive? This is represented by the orange color.
  • By how much did the percentage of positive tests increase (red) or decrease (green) as compared to the previous week?

The states are ordered by average percentage of positive tests for this week, but growth in the green bar is an important indicator that a state is moving in the right direction.

This initiative relies upon publicly available data from multiple sources. States are not consistent in how and when they release and update their data, and some may even retroactively change the numbers they report. This can affect the percentages you see presented in these data visualizations. We are taking steps to account for these irregularities in how we present the information, but it is important to understand the full context behind these data.

Weekly averages are calculated using weeks that run from Monday to Sunday.

Data Sources:

Testing data from The COVID Tracking Project;

cases data from JHU CSSE;

and population from ACS 1-year data (2018).;

It is important to track the testing that states are doing to diagnose people with COVID-19 infection in order to gauge the spread of COVID-19 in the U.S. and to know whether enough testing is occurring. When states report the number of COVID-19 tests performed, this should include the number of viral tests performed and the number of patients for which these tests were performed. Currently, states may not be distinguishing overall tests administered from the number of individuals who have been tested. This is an important limitation to the data that is available to track testing in the U.S., and states should work to address it.

When states report testing numbers for COVID-19 infection, they should not include serology or antibody tests. Antibody tests are not used to diagnose active COVID-19 infection and they do not provide insights into the number of cases of COVID-19 diagnosed or whether viral testing is sufficient to find infections that are occurring within each state. States that include serology tests within their overall COVID-19 testing numbers are misrepresenting their testing capacity and the extent to which they are working to identify COVID-19 infections within their communities. States that wish to track the number of serology tests being performed should report those numbers separately from viral tests performed to diagnose COVID-19.