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How to Use our Data

Data on the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center are provided from a variety of sources. To navigate the university’s publicly-accessible resources, please follow the guide below.

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Cases and Deaths

Access data on cases, deaths, and other critical information dating back to the beginning of the pandemic in January 2020. Provided by Johns Hopkins Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE)

Vaccinations

Explore vaccination efforts across the United States and around the world with extensive data provided by the Johns Hopkins Centers for Civic Impact.

Testing

Examine trends in testing results across the United States and delve into detailed data showing which states meet World Health Organization goals for test positivity rates.

U.S. State Level Policy Tracker

Sift easily through the disparate public health policies each state enacted throughout the pandemic along a timeline that also displays trends in cases and deaths.
  • U.S. State Level Policy Data (Updated Regularly) (CCI GitHub)

About Our Data Sources

Johns Hopkins Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE)

Most COVID-19 data from Johns Hopkins is accessible through the CSSE GitHub, which contains cases, deaths, and other critical information dating back to the beginning of the pandemic in January.

For complete information about the contents of the dataset, please read the full documentation.

Johns Hopkins Centers for Civic Impact (CCI)

For information on additional data sources utilized by the Coronavirus Resource Center please visit the data repository for COVID-19 U.S. cases by county dashboard.

Why is the CDC’s “Doses Administered” Total Greater than the JHU Global Map?

The total number of doses administered in the United States differs between the Johns Hopkins Global Map and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for several reasons. The lack of a standardized method for data collection and reporting among state and federal government agencies has resulted in an assortment of approaches. Some states report vaccinations that federal agencies administer to the employees working in those states, but other states do not. And CDC data does not identify the states in which doses have been administered at the local branches of federal entities such as the Veterans Administration, the Bureau of Prisons, the Department of Defense, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Therefore, a complete set of that data is not publicly available yet. This prevents validation of state-reported data feeding into the Global Map against the CDC’s data.

Thus, the discrepancy in the total national numbers of vaccine doses administered between the CDC website and the Johns Hopkins Global Map. In addition, adding up vaccination totals for each individual state on the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center will also not equal the CDC total.

Ideally, we would be able to display vaccination data that matches with the CDC to provide more precise estimates of what percentage of state populations have been vaccinated. For example, veterans make up 10.3% of Virginia’s population. If all those vaccinations are reported through the VA but not recorded in state data then accurate analyses of, say, herd immunity are not possible.